New Agilent Consumable Product Breaks Sales Record

Customers love Agilent’s new A-Line Quick Connect fittings

Customers love Agilent’s new A-Line Quick Connect fittings

After only nine months on the market, Agilent’s new A-Line Quick Connect fittings have set a record for revenue and customer acceptance.  Earlier this month, the new consumables line exceeded $1 million in revenue.   It is the fastest chemistries and supplies product line within Agilent to achieve that milestone.

In ultra-high pressure environments, secure fittings are essential to prevent leaks and ensure good analytical results.  Bad tubing connections can cause problems that affect accurate analysis, including peak tailing, peak broadening, split peaks and carryover.

Agilent’s A-Line Quick Connect fittings feature a novel, spring-loaded design that constantly pushes the tubing against the receiving port.  This delivers a reproducible connection for consistent chromatographic performance.  Technicians can easily finger-tighten the connection without requiring any tools or special training.

The A-Line was recognized by The Analytical Scientist with an Analytical Scientist Innovation Award (TASIA) for “Best of 2014.”

“To build on this extraordinary customer acceptance, we expanded the portfolio in June,” says Agilent’s Marc Fuerher.  “We now support UHPLC [ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography] and HPLC [high-pressure liquid chromatography] applications for most analytical labs.”

020215_a-line_t


For more information go to:

Filed Under: All, Applied Chemical
Tags: ,

Scientists Have Discovered a Sixth Basic Taste

Sweet, sour, salty, bitter, umami and… something new!

Sweet, sour, salty, bitter, umami and… something new!

For centuries, scientists identified four distinct tastes that human tongues could differentiate: sweet, sour, salty and bitter.  In 1908, a Japanese scientist proposed a fifth taste: umami, which can be translated as “pleasant savory.”  Now, scientists have identified a sixth taste: oleogustus.

Taste is one of the five traditional senses that also include sight, hearing, smell and touch.  (Scientists theorize that humans may actually possess between nine and 21 distinct senses, but that is another story.)

In a recent study, researchers at Purdue University found that our taste buds interact with fat in a way that is similar to – but distinct from – any other taste.  More than 100 participants were given isolated solutions to taste.  They were able to identify and distinguish the taste of nonesterified fatty acids (NEFAs) from the other basic tastes.

The data suggest that long-chain fatty acids stimulate a unique chemical reaction when interacting with our taste buds.  This may help explain why people experience a singular pleasure from eating high-fat foods such as cake and pizza.

The researchers propose calling this new taste “oleogustus” (Latin for “fatty taste”).  They believe this discovery could help food scientists develop healthier dietary alternatives.  Until now, the food industry believed that fat was attractive because of the way it felt in the taster’s mouth.  But instead of trying to mimic the “feel” of fat, they could try to replicate the chemical interactions it causes with taste buds.

Imagine a future table setting, where your condiments would include sugar (for sweetness), MSG (for savory), salt… and sprinklable “fat”!

This latest research expands on a previous 2012 Purdue University study that first proposed the concept of “fatty acid taste.”  That study used an Agilent gas chromatograph and mass spectrometer to separate, identify and quantify the NEFAs.


For more information go to:

Filed Under: All, Applied Chemical
Tags: , ,

Agilent and the Decline of the Woolly Mammoth

Agilent helps scientists study extinct and prehistoric species

Agilent helps scientists study extinct and prehistoric species

The woolly mammoth, a prehistoric relative of today’s African elephant, began declining 10,000 years ago at the end of the last Ice Age.  A small population endured until 1700 B.C. when the species became completely extinct.

In recent years, several complete mammoth specimens have been found, fully preserved in permafrost.  These discoveries have given scientists a rare opportunity to study the decline and extinction of a prehistoric species.

The process of extinction tends to follow a pattern.  First, there is a steady decline in both number and geographic distribution.  This is followed by increased inbreeding and a loss a genetic diversity.

Researchers in Sweden and the U.S. were able to test this by genetically examining two woolly mammoths separated by 1,000 kilometers and 40,000 years.  The first was a 44,800-year-old specimen from northeastern Siberia.  The second was a 4,300-year-old specimen, one of the last surviving individuals from Wrangel Island in the Arctic Ocean.

The more recent specimen showed 20 percent less diversity between the paternal and maternal chromosomes.  This confirms that by 1700 B.C. the species had experienced several generations of inbreeding, which reduced genetic diversity and the mammoth’s ability to adapt to a changing habitat.

Scientists have used Agilent genomics and chemical analysis solutions, including the Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer, to study the diet, ecology and DNA of the woolly mammoth and other ancient species.


For more information go to:

Filed Under: Life Sciences
Tags: ,

Please visit the Archive for more news items.

Agilent Request Form

For product or company information, please fill in all required fields.

Agilent Request Form

For product or company information, please fill in all required fields.

   
Name:
Email:
Phone:
Message:

Please leave this field empty.
captcha